Show us your best poet face!

24 February 2010 at 9:00 am (Music, Press, Releases, Shows, Spoken Word) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

e.g. bailey at The Bedlam: Show us your best poet face!

e.g. bailey celebrated the release of his debut spoken word album “American Afrikan” with an innovative, multi-media performance Saturday night at the Bedlam Theater with fellow poets, musicians and supporters. The evening featured the following: Bryan Berry, Kahlil Brewington, Aimee Bryant, Sha Cage, Chris Cox, Chantz, Guante, Ibe Kaba, M.anifest, Mankwe Ndosi, J. Otis Powell!, Sankaradjeki, See More Perspective, Andy Shaffer, DJ Stage One, Dameun Strange, Truthmaze + more. PHOTOS BY B FRESH PHOTOGRAPHY

Originally posted on City Pages on 24 February 2010.

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‘Motherless Child’

23 February 2010 at 9:00 am (Music, Recordings, Releases, Spoken Word, Work Notes) (, , , )

Motherless Child
Produced by e.g. bailey + Ben Durrant
Reinterpretation of an Afrikan American spiritual.
All voices performed by Aimee Bryant.
(A. Bryant)

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‘American Afrikan’ CD Release on Secrets of the City

20 February 2010 at 9:00 am (Music, News, Press, Releases, Shows, Spoken Word) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

E.G. Bailey ‘American Afrikan’ CD Release

The Twin Cities is a community known for its sick spoken word, and it’s no surprise to us when descriptors like “innovator” and “progressive” get thrown around in reference to our powerhouse word slingers. Another one for the vaults: Tonight, Twin Cities’ wordsmith, musician and educator, E. G. Bailey, celebrates the release of his first full-length album, American Afrikan, a proverbial spoken word and musical journey that begins in Africa, explores America and ends beyond conventions. Early previews have revered it as a prolific sonic palette – part musical theater, part audio chapbook – with blends of hip-hop, funk, jazz and electronica. Join the artist as hosts Tru Ruts and Speakeasy Records present the debut album’s CD release party. Emcee J. Otis Powell heads with performances from Guante, Mankwe Ndosi, Truthmaze, Sha Cage, See More Perspective, Chantz Erolin, Aimee Bryant, Ibé Kaba, Sankaradjeki, Dameun Strange, members of Junkyard Empire (Chris Cox + Bryan Berry), Kahlil Brewington, DJ Stage One and of course, E.G. Bailey himself. The show starts at 9:30pm is 18+ with a $5 admission. (Feb. 20th) For more info visit http://www.bedlamtheatre.org. – Juleana Enright (Secrets of the City)

Originally posted on Secrets of the City on 20 Feb 2010.

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E.G. Bailey ‘American Afrikan’ CD Release

18 February 2010 at 4:15 pm (Music, News, Press, Releases, Shows, Spoken Word) (, , , , , , , , , , )

E.G. Bailey ‘American Afrikan’ CD Release
@ Bedlam Theatre
1501 6th St S.
Minneapolis

10pm / 18+ / $5 advance

This weekend, E.G. Bailey is going to drop a bomb — a “proverbial bomb” that is! On Saturday, the Bedlam Theatre hosts the release show for Bailey’s debut album, titled AMERICAN AFRIKAN, showcasing his creative mix of powerful spoken word, preformance art and hip-hop/funk/jazz/electronic music. Additionally, the night will feature the work of many more artists and musicians like Guante, Mankwe Ndosi, Truthmaze, Chantz Erolin, Aimee Bryant, Ibé Kaba, Sankaradjeki, Dameun Strange, Kahlil Brewington, DJ Stage One and more.

Click HERE for the Bedlam site

Originally posted on l’étoile magazine on 18 Feb 2010.

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Spoken-word work gets right to the point

18 February 2010 at 9:00 am (Music, News, Press, Recordings, Releases, Shows, Spoken Word) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

CD review: Spoken-word work
gets right to the point

By John Ziegler, Duluth News Tribune

He can come on like a freight train. Words are his medium. He will make you laugh. He will make you cry. He will make you think.

His name is E.G. Bailey and his brand-new release “American Afrikan” combines spoken word, poetry and music to explore what it is to be an Afrikan in America today. It doesn’t just skim along the surface in that exploration, it heaves from below like a bulldozer churning up slabs of concrete, tree roots and old asphalt in its quest — Bailey leading the narrative charge.

Using language like John Coltrane used the tenor or soprano saxophone, Bailey — together with friends such as Aimee Bryant, Katrah Quey, Sha Cage, Hipgnosis, D.J.Limbs, plus African poets Ibe Kaba and Sankaradjeki; Dubai jazz ensemble Abstrakt Collision, and Mankwe Ndosi, the singer from Atmosphere — uses bits of pre-recorded sound, field recordings (including Liberian work songs from the Mano Tribe) and jazz. He rails, he whispers, he implores, he exhorts and subtly weaves his spell.

“K Street Blues: The Bailout Plan” sounds like it could have been Sonny Rollins captured on the Williamsburg Bridge in 1952 talking to the skyline with his horn.

“America” is Bailey (with Abstrakt Collision giving an eerie, angular backdrop) holding a mirror up to our own country with all its actions and how they have morphed over time. “America with your varicose veins and Catholic guilt, I fear you and I love you … America, it’s getting harder to defend you.”

Aimee Bryant’s stirring multi-tracked version of “Motherless Child” is a riveting take on this black spiritual.

“Afrikan is the New American” has an almost Prince-like groove smothered in chicken grease.

Bailey is the real deal. He has created spoken word dynamics in film, theater and recordings during his travels through this country as well as England, South Africa, France and Serbia. He is the founder of the MN Spoken Word Association, Tru Ruts Endeavors and the Spoken Word and Hip Hop Institute at the University of Minnesota. He’s been inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in the New York Modern Museum of Art.

“American Afrikan” is not just a journey but an adventure that, during February’s Black History Month, explores identity, history, culture and what it means to be black in America today.

The CD release of this wonderful piece of art takes place Saturday evening at the Bedlam Theatre in Minneapolis and should not be missed.

E.G. Bailey / “American Afrikan”
Genre: Spoken word/Poetry/Jazz/Hip Hop/Electronica
Label: Tru Ruts/Speakeasy Records
Web site: http://www.egbailey.com, myspace.com/egbailey
Produced by: E.G. Bailey and Ben Durant

Upcoming show: Saturday at 9:30 p.m., the CD release party at the Bedlam Theatre, Minneapolis. Cost $5. Ages 18 and older. Includes special guests Guante, Sha Cage, Mankwe Ndosi, Ibe Kaba and more.

John Ziegler has worked in the music industry for the past 35 years as a radio host, interviewer, record producer and professional musician.

Originally posted on Duluth News Tribune blog on 18 February 2010.

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E.G. Bailey: American Afrikan Review

9 February 2010 at 12:06 am (Music, News, Press, Recordings, Releases, Spoken Word) (, , , , , , , , , , )

E.G. Bailey: American Afrikan Review
by Jon Behm, Reviler

I am not going to qualify my review of E.G. Bailey’s American Afrikan with a score.  As a white person, I feel like it would be a little disingenuous of me to try and attach a grade to the African American cultural experience.  And that is certainly what American Afrikan is – more so than a musical work, spoken word piece, or political polemic.  It is an examination of what it means to be black in America today, as well as what it used to mean, what it feels like, and what it could be.  That it is made more accessible through rhythms and music makes it no less authentic – music is ingrained in African American history moreso than perhaps any other culture.  And if that all sounds a bit serious for you – know that it is also an enjoyable listen on a purely aesthetic level.

Amerikan begins with “Professor Goodwin’s Preface,” a poignant (and also often hilarious) spoken word piece that pokes playfully at the oftentimes confusing semantics of race.  From there Bailey dives down through history, unearthing slave chants, blues, jazz, hip hop, the sounds of shackles, and more.  Whether he’s singing, reciting poetry, or completely silent, Bailey’s masterful feeling for the power of words (and their absence) is felt throughout.  “America” is a weighty poem set to a jazz score by Middle Eastern ensemble Abstrakt Collision.  Not one to shy away from controversy, “America” is packed full of lines that cut like knives:

America, which of my sins are original / Do I repent before the cross or the dollar / before the ballot or the bullet / America, I can’t take you home to my mother / she’s afraid you might try to molest her / rape her land / leave her suffering, her children desolate.

It isn’t all quite so severe though – where the record is shadowed by the turbulence of history, it also celebrates life and happiness.  The title track is an incredibly long, African rhythm infused, totally danceable banger that features Ibe Kaba and Sankara Djeki (also remixed by local rapper M.anifest as a bonus track).  “Motherless Child” is a heartbreakingly beautiful tune sung by Aimee Bryant.   To finish things off “Afrikan is the New Amerikan” shuts it down with some feverous instrumental funk.

There is so much history, culture, and experience packed into American Afrikan that to summarize would be to attempt to summarize all of African American experience (no easy task).  Just as history means different things to different people, doubtlessly the record will affect listeners in many different ways – and what I tell you about my experience may be worlds away from your own.  You will never know until you find out though, so I highly recommend giving American Afrikan a listen.  If you dig what you hear, Bailey will be playing a CD release party at the Bedlam Theater on Feb. 20th.

Originally posted on Reviler blog on 9 February 2010.

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